Wednesday, 17 June 2020

Return of Two year Post-Study Work Visa - 2020

Post study work visa 2020


Last year the UK Government announced the return of two year post-study work visas. 

The new immigration route will allow eligible students at higher education providers, studying any subject, to work for two years after completing their course. From information published so far, we understand that there will be no cap on the number of students who will be able to apply under this route. 

The UK Home Office has confirmed that international students will remain eligible for post-study work rights upon graduation if they begin or continue their studies online in the 2020/21 academic year.


The Home Office has announced key features of the route:

  • It will be open to international students who have successfully completed a course of study at undergraduate (RQF 6) level or above at a Higher Education Provider with a track record of compliance, and who have a valid and extant student visa at the time of application;

  • The application process will be simple. There will be an application fee and applicants will pay the Immigration Health Surcharge;

  • Applicants will be subject to identity, criminality and security checks;

  • The leave period granted will be two years and will be non-extendable. Settlement rights will not be accrued;

  • Individuals will be able to work, or look for work in any sector, at any level;

  • Individuals will be able to switch into the skilled work route if they meet the requirements.
     

Successful students will then (as of 2020) be allowed to stay in the UK for two years after they graduate. During this time, they can job-hunt and work in the UK. Once the two-year period has finished, they can switch to another visa category, such as a Tier 2 Work Visa, or a Spouse Visa.



Reference  - UK Home Office 


Wednesday, 20 May 2020

Coronavirus (Covid-19): info for international students


UK Education for All is here to support international students and those who work with them in whatever way we can. Over the next few months as we all adapt to new ways of living and working we hope to support you with news, information, guidance and blogs from students and members.

The UK Home Office has introduced some temporary measures around visa applications and immigration status in response to Covid-19. The most up to date guidance about everything that has changed in response to Covid-19 is available in a dedicated section here


The most up to date guidance about everything that has changed in response to Covid-19 is available here in this link

Monday, 13 November 2017

Student Loans Fraud Exposed by BBC Panorama

Greenwich School of Management in London - also known as GSM London has come under scrutiny amid reports from BBC panorama programme today, The BBC says whistle blowers tipped it off about a "dodgy freelance agent" and malpractices in recruiting students for its degree programme with Plymouth University .

BBC Panorama's investigation comes at a time of massive change in Higher education landscape in England, The Higher Education and Research Act, passed earlier this year, would create a powerful new regulator for higher education in England called the Office for Students. The government is also looking at whether new businesses could offer degrees from day one on a probationary basis, which could attract interest from companies operating elsewhere in the world.

About £400m-a-year is received by 112 private colleges through the student loan system. The government is keen to expand the sector as part of reforms designed to make degree and diploma courses more accessible to people who might otherwise find it difficult to enter higher education.

This year total student loan debt, from universities and private colleges, amounted to £100bn.

In todays BBC's  Panaorama programme Plymouth University and GSM London college have been heavily implicated in student loan fraud, both institutions have declined direct involvement in the matter. You can see more on this story on Panorama, Student Loan Scandal on BBC One at 7.30pm on Monday 13th November and afterwards on iPlayer.

Monday, 6 February 2017

UK student Visa and Immigration updates in relation to EU & non EU International Students in UK - 2017

The Home Office released a statement of changes to the immigration rules on the 3 November 2016. The main changes affecting students will affect applications made on or after the 24 November 2016

Today, we will reflect on Trends and Observations for year 2017 – below we will try to outline UK student Visa and Immigration updates in relation to EU & non EU International Students in UK

Last Month, UKCISA voiced on International Student matters in relation to UK Immigration policy at Home Affairs committee's Immigration Inquiry

Below is a submission made by UKCISA to Home Office Committee’s Immigration Inquiry? - We shall outline few major observations from the submission

“Impact of current (Immigration) policy”
  • The cumulative effect, however, of government rhetoric, policies to create a ‘hostile environment’, hugely complex and restrictive rules and a disproportionately harsh inspection and compliance regime - even for globally recognised and respected universities – together with the abolition of Post-Study Work - has been, for the majority of institutions, a significant downturn in international student numbers.
  • Of particular concern have been the so-called ‘credibility interviews’ which undermine the objectivity and transparency of the decision making process and which have led some institutions – fearing the revocation of their licence if the visa refusal limit is breached – to restrict or end entirely making offers to any students in particular countries (such as Pakistan, Bangladesh and Nigeria) – details available.
  • Numbers going to private colleges have been decimated, those to publicly funded Further Education colleges reduced by over 50% and the latest Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) returns show that overall numbers coming to UK universities are no longer increasing and that first year arrivals are now on the decrease.
  • The HESA statistics also show that over the last 5 years the downturn and impact on certain local communities (which arguably might need investment and jobs most) has been particularly severe with non-EU student numbers decreasing in Bedfordshire by 66%, Teesside by 65%, Staffordshire 52%, Bradford 45%, Hull by 40%, Wolverhampton 37%.
  • Whilst ministers say that applications to Russell Group universities have been on the rise (which is true) this is not the case for the vast majority of institutions and many believe that a change in policy on non-EU/Tier 4 students is now essential.
     
  • This is now urgently required as a January 2017 report by the Higher Education Policy Institute (HEPI) suggests that any further ‘crackdown’ by the Home Office – as suggested by the Secretary of State’s speech in October 2016 – could lead to additional lost income of £2bn per year.
  • The final concern is that many believe that without access to loans and being subject to higher fees the number of EU students coming to the UK may significantly decrease in the future.

Amid this,The home secretary, Amber Rudd, pledged a crackdown on international student numbers at the Conservative party conference in October,last year, to include tougher visa rules for “lower quality” universities and courses. But senior university sources are warning that the cutbacks could be far more severe than expected. They say they have seen Home Office plans that model slashing overseas student numbers, with one option to cut the current 300,000 to 170,000 a year.


Wednesday, 13 July 2016

More than 99,000 non-EU students visas curtailed by the Home Office in the past three years

More than 30,000 non-EU students a year have had their visas curtailed by the Home Office in the past three years, according to the figures obtained by BBC News show. Also it is revealed that 410 educational establishments had their licences to sponsor international students revoked in the same period.

The figures, released by the Home Office under Freedom of Information rules, show 99,635 students had their visas curtailed in the three years to the end of December 2015:
  • 33,210 in 2013
  • 34,210 in 2014
  • 32,215 in 2015
Of the educational establishments that lost their licences, there were
  • 199 in 2013
  • 129 in 2014
  • 72 in 2015
Some later had their licences reinstated - but, overall, the number of establishments holding them fell from 1,706 in 2013 to 1,405 by the end of last year.

According to official figures, 201,763 students applied for UK study visas last year.

These include:
  • 166,366 at universities
  • 15,982 in further education
  • 2,930 in English language schools
  • 13,675 in independent schools
According to an Office of National Statistics published in January, 192,000 international students arrived in the UK for long-term study in the year to June 2015 - down from a peak of 238,000 in 2010.

Summary of Recent Changes to UK Student Visa 2014, 2015, 2016 July onward
1. Summary of Recent Changes to UK Student Visa and News Watch end of 2015 to 2016,February

Subscribe via email to Receive New Posts straight in to your Inbox

Be the first to learn about...Updates on UK education policy, Updates on student visa matters, College/University rankings, Etc... Subscribe Today to Receive New Posts straight in to your Inbox ##About http://www.ukeducationforall.com, Disclaimer Policy and Privacy Policy##: All information or other content, including, but not limited to, opinions or statements and advice, made on the site are those of Rushdy Razak(Chief Editor) here in known as Editor or respective authors, not of www.ukeducationforall.com and should not necessarily be relied upon. www.ukeducationforall.com does not essentially approve, support, authorize, encourage or agree with the comments, opinions or statements of any information or other content on the site and does not in any way guarantee the accuracy, reliability, usefulness or completeness thereof. Under no circumstances will www.ukeducationforall.com or the Editor be responsible for any damage or loss arising from anyone's reliance on information or other content shown on the site, or transmitted or otherwise communicated to users of www.ukeducationforall.com. The information provided by this blog/website is solely for advisory basis and originates from its information sources and personal opinions of the writers, the opinions or the projected outlook presented by the editor not connected or influenced by any vendors, institutions or institutions he works for